Tag: Fine Gael

The Garda Inspectorate Report is Just One Small Part of More to Come

(Originally Published at Irishleftreview.org in March 2014)

In April of last year, former Irish Independent journalist, Gemma O’Doherty did something that no journalist appropriately indoctrinated is supposed to do: She dared to question the received orthodoxy. The dogma in question related to prominent figures in Irish society having penalty points and Fixed Charge Notices (FCNs) cancelled. O’Doherty discovered that the Garda Commissioner, Martin Callinan, had penalty points of his own cancelled and dared to approach him about it. Not long afterwards she was brought in front of an internal committee of Independent News & Media (INM), the company which owns the Irish Independent, and reprimanded for her approaching the Commissioner. By August she was made compulsorily redundant. Her former boss, Stephen Rae, also happened to have penalty points cancelled and was the former editor of Garda Review magazine, “the professional voice of the Garda” according to its website. This is just one part of the larger story surrounding the penalty points scandal which has been slowly coming to a boil over the last two years. The only reason that the cancellation of penalty points has been thrust into the public sphere is because of the actions of two whistleblowers; retired Garda John Wilson and Sgt. Maurice McCabe.

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Emperor Kenny’s New Clothes

(Originally Published on Corkstudentnews.com in June 2010)

It has now been just over two weeks since Richard Bruton directly or indirectly, whichever way you want to look at it, challenged Enda Kenny’s leadership of the main opposition party, Fine Gael. While it might have been an important enough event to write about at the time, I felt that it was better to wait until some time had passed so that an assessment of the fallout from the ruckus within the ranks of Fine Gael can be made. It seems now that in the two weeks since the failed coup, Kenny has emerged victorious and even the polls point to this. However, this much is obvious. Things are far from settled in the seats of the opposition in Dáil Éireann and the Irish public has a notoriously short memory when it comes to politics.